8 new entries added to tips to be happy, that include pictures. 1. Let us be grateful to people who make us happy. They are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom. - Marcel Proust

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TIPS TO BE HAPPY

Giving thanks makes everyone happy and is very healthy to practice daily.

7 Scientifically Proven Benefits Of Gratitude That Will Motivate You To Give Thanks Year-Round

A short piece points out 7 things that we may be able to do to help us stay with an attitude of gratitude all year round.
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<div><div><i>Fotolia</i></div><div><br></div><div>It’s that time of year where many people begin thinking about everything they have to be thankful for. Although it’s nice to count your blessings on Thanksgiving, being thankful throughout the year could have tremendous benefits&nbsp;on&nbsp;your quality of life.</div><div><br></div><div>In fact, gratitude may be one of the most overlooked tools that we all have access to every day. Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and it certainly doesn’t take much time, but the benefits are enormous. Research reveals gratitude can have these seven benefits:</div><div><br></div><div><b>1. Gratitude opens the door to more relationships.</b>&nbsp;Not only does saying “thank you” constitute good manners, but showing appreciation can help you win new friends, according to a 2104 study published in Emotion. The study found that thanking a new acquaintance makes them more likely to seek an ongoing relationship. So whether you thank a stranger for holding the door or you send a quick thank-you note to that co-worker who helped you with a project, acknowledging other people’s contributions can lead to new opportunities.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><b>2. Gratitude improves physical&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/health/" title="Health" target="_blank">health</a></b>. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and they report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Not surprisingly, grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health. &nbsp;They exercise more often and are more likely to attend regular check-ups with their doctors, which is likely to contribute to further longevity.</div><div><br></div><div><b>3. Gratitude improves psychological health.</b>&nbsp;Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., a leading gratitude researcher, has conducted multiple studies on the link between gratitude and well-being. His research confirms that gratitude effectively increases happiness and reduces depression.</div><div><br></div><div><b>4. Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression.&nbsp;</b>Grateful people are more likely to behave in a prosocial manner, even when others behave less kind, according to a 2012 study by the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/colleges/university-of-kentucky/" title="University of Kentucky" target="_blank">University of Kentucky.&nbsp;</a>Study participants who ranked higher on gratitude scales were less likely to retaliate against others, even when given negative feedback. They experienced more sensitivity and empathy toward other people and a decreased desire to seek revenge.</div><div><br></div><div><b>5. Grateful people sleep better.&nbsp;</b>Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer.</div><div><br></div><div><b>6. Gratitude improves self-esteem.</b>&nbsp;A 2014 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Applied&nbsp;Sport&nbsp;Psychology&nbsp;</i>found that gratitude increased athlete’s self-esteem, which is an essential component&nbsp;to&nbsp;optimal performance. Other studies have shown that gratitude reduces social comparisons. Rather than becoming resentful toward people who have more money or better jobs – which is a major factor in reduced self-esteem- grateful people are able to appreciate other people’s accomplishments.</div><div><br></div><div><b>7. Gratitude increases mental strength.&nbsp;</b>For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma. &nbsp;A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War Veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. &nbsp;A 2003 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Personality and Social Psychology</i>&nbsp;found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the terrorist attacks on September 11. &nbsp;Recognizing all you have to be thankful for – even during the worst times of your life – fosters resilience.</div><div><br></div><div>We all have the ability and opportunity to cultivate gratitude. Simply take a few moments to focus on all that you have – rather than complain about all the things you think you deserve. &nbsp;Developing an “attitude of gratitude” is one of the simplest ways to improve your satisfaction with life.</div><div><br></div><div><i>Amy Morin is a psychotherapist and the author of</i>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amymorinlcsw.com/book/" title="13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do" target="_blank">13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do</a>.</div></div>
<div><div><i>Fotolia</i> </div><div><br></div>< ;div>It’s that time of year where many people begin thinking about everything they have to be thankful for. Although it’s nice to count your blessings on Thanksgiving, being thankful throughout the year could have tremendous benefits&nbsp;on&nbsp;your quality of life.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div>In fact, gratitude may be one of the most overlooked tools that we all have access to every day. Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and it certainly doesn’t take much time, but the benefits are enormous. Research reveals gratitude can have these seven benefits:</div><div><br></d iv><div><b>1. Gratitude opens the door to more relationships.</b>&nbsp;Not only does saying “thank you” constitute good manners, but showing appreciation can help you win new friends, according to a 2104 study published in Emotion. The study found that thanking a new acquaintance makes them more likely to seek an ongoing relationship. So whether you thank a stranger for holding the door or you send a quick thank-you note to that co-worker who helped you with a project, acknowledging other people’s contributions can lead to new opportunities.</div><div><br>& lt;/div><div><br></div>< div><b>2. Gratitude improves physical&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/health/" title="Health" target="_blank">health</a>< ;/b>. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and they report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Not surprisingly, grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health. &nbsp;They exercise more often and are more likely to attend regular check-ups with their doctors, which is likely to contribute to further longevity.</div><div><br></ div><div><b>3. Gratitude improves psychological health.</b>&nbsp;Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., a leading gratitude researcher, has conducted multiple studies on the link between gratitude and well-being. His research confirms that gratitude effectively increases happiness and reduces depression.</div><div><br>< /div><div><b>4. Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression.&nbsp;</b>Grateful people are more likely to behave in a prosocial manner, even when others behave less kind, according to a 2012 study by the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/colleges/univer sity-of-kentucky/" title="University of Kentucky" target="_blank">University of Kentucky.&nbsp;</a>Study participants who ranked higher on gratitude scales were less likely to retaliate against others, even when given negative feedback. They experienced more sensitivity and empathy toward other people and a decreased desire to seek revenge.</div><div><br></di v><div><b>5. Grateful people sleep better.&nbsp;</b>Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer.</div><div><br></div ><div><b>6. Gratitude improves self-esteem.</b>&nbsp;A 2014 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Applied&nbsp;Sport&nbsp;Psychology&n bsp;</i>found that gratitude increased athlete’s self-esteem, which is an essential component&nbsp;to&nbsp;optimal performance. Other studies have shown that gratitude reduces social comparisons. Rather than becoming resentful toward people who have more money or better jobs – which is a major factor in reduced self-esteem- grateful people are able to appreciate other people’s accomplishments.</div><div><br> ;</div><div><b>7. Gratitude increases mental strength.&nbsp;</b>For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma. &nbsp;A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War Veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. &nbsp;A 2003 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Personality and Social Psychology</i>&nbsp;found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the terrorist attacks on September 11. &nbsp;Recognizing all you have to be thankful for – even during the worst times of your life – fosters resilience.</div><div><br>< /div><div>We all have the ability and opportunity to cultivate gratitude. Simply take a few moments to focus on all that you have – rather than complain about all the things you think you deserve. &nbsp;Developing an “attitude of gratitude” is one of the simplest ways to improve your satisfaction with life.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><i>Amy Morin is a psychotherapist and the author of</i>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amymorinlcsw.com/book/&quo t; title="13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do" target="_blank">13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do</a>.</div></div>
Amy Morin
Inspirational Articles 

10 Tips For Staying Happy At Work

Ten helpful tips to ensure that you remain happy at work.
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<div>If you find yourself longing for greener work pastures, don't immediately go looking for the first exit ramp off of your chosen career path. The Balance Team, which specializes in professional- and personal-growth seminars for administrative and executive assistants in Fortune 1000 companies, suggests these 10 tips for staying content at work:</div><div><br></div><div><b>1. Keep Personal Problems Personal</b></div><div><br></div><div>When you're preoccupied with personal issues, it's difficult to concentrate or be happy at work, says Alison Rhodes, a founding partner of The Balance Team. By all means, make sure you have your kids covered in the event of an&nbsp;emergency,&nbsp;but realize that nobody's personal life is ever going to be completely problem-free. Just as you need to let go of work to enjoy your time at home, it's important to leave personal worries at home so you can focus and be productive at work.</div><div><br></div><div><b>2. Create an Office Nest</b></div><div><br></div><div>"You are at your job for at least eight hours a day, which is more time than you probably spend in your bed," says Jennifer Star, a founding partner of The Balance Team. "Make your space your own, decorate your area as much as your company policy permits, and make yourself as comfortable and relaxed as you can be in your office.</div><div><br></div><div><b>3. Develop an Office Support System</b></div><div><br></div><div>"Gathering a circle of colleagues who share similar backgrounds or lifestyles can take a lot of pressure off you at work," says Rhodes. "When you are able to voice your feelings to people who understand, it can really help minimize stress.</div><div><br></div><div><b>4. Eat Healthy and Drink Lots of Water</b></div><div><br></div><div>"Maintaining a good diet and keeping yourself properly hydrated throughout your workday can really make a big difference in your energy level and attitude," says Shirly Weiss, a certified holistic health and nutritional counselor and consulting expert for The Balance Team. "And if you can manage to maintain a diet of whole foods, as opposed to refined foods such as sugar and bread, then you'll really be ahead of the game.</div><div><br></div><div><b>5. Be Organized</b></div><div><br></div><div>Create a manageable schedule to handle your workload, suggests Stacy Raden, a founding partner of The Balance Team. "A sense of empowerment stems from accomplishment," she says. "When you feel overwhelmed, it tends to intensify dissatisfaction. By being proactive and taking control, employees can feel a sense of satisfaction, enhanced confidence and motivation.</div><div><br></div><div><b>6. Move Around</b></div><div><br></div><div>"Working in an office can be a very sedentary job, so it's especially important to your overall sense of health and happiness to take a few minutes during your workday to get up and move a little," says Jason&nbsp;Bergund, founding director of&nbsp;Dancetherapy, a dance class, and a consulting expert for The Balance Team.</div><div><br></div><div><b>7. Don't Try to Change Your Coworkers</b></div><div><br></div><div>"You can't change anyone; you can only change the way you react to them," says Star. "Don't let other people's actions affect you. Just figure out a way to resolve conflicts and avert uncomfortable situations."</div><div><br></div><div><b>8. Reward Yourself</b></div><div><br></div><div>Identify a reward outside of your job, and indulge yourself, says Raden. Whether it be dinner with friends, a movie, exercise or a manicure, treat yourself every once in awhile. Just as stress from home can interfere with work, the positive aspects of your life can influence mood at work as well.</div><div><br></div><div><b>9. Take a Breather</b></div><div><br></div><div>"In yoga, we practice the breath of joy, in which we inhale a long breath and then exhale laughter," says Sarah Schain, founding director of Yoga Tales studios for children and a consulting expert for The Balance Team. Stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Inhale deeply, then exhale laughter and bend forward. Try to do this movement 10 times.</div><div><br></div><div><b>10. Focus on the Positive</b></div><div><br></div><div>"Identify the things that you like at work, even if they are as simple as your coworkers or the nice view from your office window," says Raden. "You create your own&nbsp;mind-set. If you stress the positives, you will make your job more enjoyable. Worrying about the negatives may cause you to become overwhelmed."</div>
<div>If you find yourself longing for greener work pastures, don't immediately go looking for the first exit ramp off of your chosen career path. The Balance Team, which specializes in professional- and personal-growth seminars for administrative and executive assistants in Fortune 1000 companies, suggests these 10 tips for staying content at work:</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><b>1. Keep Personal Problems Personal</b></div><div><br& gt;</div><div>When you're preoccupied with personal issues, it's difficult to concentrate or be happy at work, says Alison Rhodes, a founding partner of The Balance Team. By all means, make sure you have your kids covered in the event of an&nbsp;emergency,&nbsp;but realize that nobody's personal life is ever going to be completely problem-free. Just as you need to let go of work to enjoy your time at home, it's important to leave personal worries at home so you can focus and be productive at work.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><b>2. Create an Office Nest</b></div><div><br>& lt;/div><div>"You are at your job for at least eight hours a day, which is more time than you probably spend in your bed," says Jennifer Star, a founding partner of The Balance Team. "Make your space your own, decorate your area as much as your company policy permits, and make yourself as comfortable and relaxed as you can be in your office.</div><div><br></div ><div><b>3. Develop an Office Support System</b></div><div><br> ;</div><div>"Gathering a circle of colleagues who share similar backgrounds or lifestyles can take a lot of pressure off you at work," says Rhodes. "When you are able to voice your feelings to people who understand, it can really help minimize stress.</div><div><br></div ><div><b>4. Eat Healthy and Drink Lots of Water</b></div><div><br> </div><div>"Maintaining a good diet and keeping yourself properly hydrated throughout your workday can really make a big difference in your energy level and attitude," says Shirly Weiss, a certified holistic health and nutritional counselor and consulting expert for The Balance Team. "And if you can manage to maintain a diet of whole foods, as opposed to refined foods such as sugar and bread, then you'll really be ahead of the game.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><b>5. Be Organized</b></div><div><br ></div><div>Create a manageable schedule to handle your workload, suggests Stacy Raden, a founding partner of The Balance Team. "A sense of empowerment stems from accomplishment," she says. "When you feel overwhelmed, it tends to intensify dissatisfaction. By being proactive and taking control, employees can feel a sense of satisfaction, enhanced confidence and motivation.</div><div><br>< /div><div><b>6. Move Around</b></div><div><br> ;</div><div>"Working in an office can be a very sedentary job, so it's especially important to your overall sense of health and happiness to take a few minutes during your workday to get up and move a little," says Jason&nbsp;Bergund, founding director of&nbsp;Dancetherapy, a dance class, and a consulting expert for The Balance Team.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><b>7. Don't Try to Change Your Coworkers</b></div><div><br ></div><div>"You can't change anyone; you can only change the way you react to them," says Star. "Don't let other people's actions affect you. Just figure out a way to resolve conflicts and avert uncomfortable situations."</div><div><br&g t;</div><div><b>8. Reward Yourself</b></div><div><br& gt;</div><div>Identify a reward outside of your job, and indulge yourself, says Raden. Whether it be dinner with friends, a movie, exercise or a manicure, treat yourself every once in awhile. Just as stress from home can interfere with work, the positive aspects of your life can influence mood at work as well.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><b>9. Take a Breather</b></div><div><br& gt;</div><div>"In yoga, we practice the breath of joy, in which we inhale a long breath and then exhale laughter," says Sarah Schain, founding director of Yoga Tales studios for children and a consulting expert for The Balance Team. Stand with your feet together and your arms at your sides. Inhale deeply, then exhale laughter and bend forward. Try to do this movement 10 times.</div><div><br></div& gt;<div><b>10. Focus on the Positive</b></div><div><br& gt;</div><div>"Identify the things that you like at work, even if they are as simple as your coworkers or the nice view from your office window," says Raden. "You create your own&nbsp;mind-set. If you stress the positives, you will make your job more enjoyable. Worrying about the negatives may cause you to become overwhelmed."</div>
Beverly West
Inspirational Personal Development 
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