5 new entries added to articles, that include pictures. 1. <div>Dear Kids,</div><div><br></div><div>Mother's Day is upon us again, and television would have you think that we, female parents, are interested in things that most of us would gladly go without.</div><div><br></div><div><b>1. Jewelry.</b> I don't know about you, but I spend 90 percent of my time in black yoga pants. The other 10 percent is spent naked, looking for a pair clean enough to be worn in public. My only sadness is that they don't make reversible yoga pants so that I can wear them for double the amount of time. Even when I'm working, I look for the softest, most dressed-down clothes that can pass as "professional."</div><div><br></div><div>I have no need for fancy baubles that my 10-month-old would just try to rip off of my neck or wrists. I change what feels like 100 diapers a day. Perhaps one day I will be dripping in jewels rather than up to my elbows in wipes, but today is not that day.</div><div><br></div><div><b>2. Flowers.</b> While they're beautiful and fragrant, when I see flowers all I think is: Great. Something else I have to feed and keep alive. I will gratefully accept your roses, lilies and tulips, but try not to judge mommy when they're hunched over in a letter "C" three days later because I forgot to empty in the packet or magic crystals and change the water. I have a lot on my mind, sweethearts.</div><div><br></div><div><b>3. Chocolate. </b>I will graciously accept a box of chocolates, but really... moms can buy those for ourselves. In fact, I have secret chocolate stashed all over the house.</div><div><br></div><div><b>4. Perfume.</b> Right now I'm wearing Eau de Goldfish. It smells like GMOs and desperation.</div><div><br></div><div><b>5. Vacuum cleaners, cleaning supplies or pots and pans.</b> Buying one of these items for Mother's Day is an act of war. Be careful. Even if I need or want one of these items, today is not the day to remind me of household obligations.</div><div><br></div><div>Kids, do you want to make mommy really, truly happy on Mother's Day? If so, there's just one gift that all of us would REALLY love, and I have some good news: it's 100 percent free.</div><div><br></div><div>We want sleep.</div><div><br></div><div>We want uninterrupted, deep, snoring, drool-dripping, floating on a comforter, surrounded by pillows, no-kids-in-the-bed, dream-filled sleep. We don't want to be drizzled with magical Sandman dust -- no, we want him to empty the bag out on our heads until it's empty.</div><div><br></div><div>Even though most of our brains have been programmed to wake up at 6:30 a.m. latest, even if there isn't a young child shaking us from slumber and loudly inquiring about breakfast, we'd still revel in the ability to lie in bed until we come to a complete state of alertness before dealing with bodily fluids or breaking up the first of 10,000 sibling fights.</div><div><br></div><div>Every mom I know fantasizes about falling into a delicious state of unconsciousness, knowing with full confidence that she won't be jerked awake by the sound of a baby who needs changing, feeding or twilight rocking. Toddlers, we love you dearly. Your inquisitive minds, protruding bellies and signature mispronunciations are all part of your undeniable charm. How about for Mother's Day you stay in your bed and keep your eyes closed until I come get you? Let's put a 24-hour hiatus on the 2 a.m. chitchat and waking up with the sun, shall we?</div><div><br></div><div>I can already hear you saying it: "You're going to miss this one day." Of course, when you kids are all grown up, we'll occasionally long for sneakers in three sizes by the door again and the sound of innocent laughter reverberating through the house -- but you know what we won't miss? Sleep deprivation. We won't miss waking up in the morning feeling like we've been working the <i>Dinosaur Train</i> night shift. I, for one, will not miss being a zombie mom.</div><div><br></div><div>We also won't miss stories from friends about how their 16 children all slept through the night by the time they were two weeks old (GOOD FOR YOU), but that's a different story entirely.</div><div><br></div><div>So, children of the world, listen closely. For Mother's Day, drawings are wonderful. Mugs are appreciated. Clay handprints will be treasured forever, we promise. But if you really want to make mommy happy on her special day, please pass the heck out. And stay like that until 10 a.m. Love you and thank you.</div><div><br></div><div><i>Bunmi Laditan's first book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Honest-Toddler-Childs-Guide-Parenting/dp/1476734771/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;sr=&amp;qid=" title=" The Honest Toddler: A Child's Guide to Parenting" target="_blank">The Honest Toddler: A Child's Guide to Parenting</a>, is in stores now.</i></div>

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The Most Important Thing All Moms Want For Mother's Day

A funny guide describes what to give Mom for Mother's Day, and what gifts she will loathe.
1
<div>Dear Kids,</div><div><br></div><div>Mother's Day is upon us again, and television would have you think that we, female parents, are interested in things that most of us would gladly go without.</div><div><br></div><div><b>1. Jewelry.</b> I don't know about you, but I spend 90 percent of my time in black yoga pants. The other 10 percent is spent naked, looking for a pair clean enough to be worn in public. My only sadness is that they don't make reversible yoga pants so that I can wear them for double the amount of time. Even when I'm working, I look for the softest, most dressed-down clothes that can pass as "professional."</div><div><br></div><div>I have no need for fancy baubles that my 10-month-old would just try to rip off of my neck or wrists. I change what feels like 100 diapers a day. Perhaps one day I will be dripping in jewels rather than up to my elbows in wipes, but today is not that day.</div><div><br></div><div><b>2. Flowers.</b> While they're beautiful and fragrant, when I see flowers all I think is: Great. Something else I have to feed and keep alive. I will gratefully accept your roses, lilies and tulips, but try not to judge mommy when they're hunched over in a letter "C" three days later because I forgot to empty in the packet or magic crystals and change the water. I have a lot on my mind, sweethearts.</div><div><br></div><div><b>3. Chocolate. </b>I will graciously accept a box of chocolates, but really... moms can buy those for ourselves. In fact, I have secret chocolate stashed all over the house.</div><div><br></div><div><b>4. Perfume.</b> Right now I'm wearing Eau de Goldfish. It smells like GMOs and desperation.</div><div><br></div><div><b>5. Vacuum cleaners, cleaning supplies or pots and pans.</b> Buying one of these items for Mother's Day is an act of war. Be careful. Even if I need or want one of these items, today is not the day to remind me of household obligations.</div><div><br></div><div>Kids, do you want to make mommy really, truly happy on Mother's Day? If so, there's just one gift that all of us would REALLY love, and I have some good news: it's 100 percent free.</div><div><br></div><div>We want sleep.</div><div><br></div><div>We want uninterrupted, deep, snoring, drool-dripping, floating on a comforter, surrounded by pillows, no-kids-in-the-bed, dream-filled sleep. We don't want to be drizzled with magical Sandman dust -- no, we want him to empty the bag out on our heads until it's empty.</div><div><br></div><div>Even though most of our brains have been programmed to wake up at 6:30 a.m. latest, even if there isn't a young child shaking us from slumber and loudly inquiring about breakfast, we'd still revel in the ability to lie in bed until we come to a complete state of alertness before dealing with bodily fluids or breaking up the first of 10,000 sibling fights.</div><div><br></div><div>Every mom I know fantasizes about falling into a delicious state of unconsciousness, knowing with full confidence that she won't be jerked awake by the sound of a baby who needs changing, feeding or twilight rocking. Toddlers, we love you dearly. Your inquisitive minds, protruding bellies and signature mispronunciations are all part of your undeniable charm. How about for Mother's Day you stay in your bed and keep your eyes closed until I come get you? Let's put a 24-hour hiatus on the 2 a.m. chitchat and waking up with the sun, shall we?</div><div><br></div><div>I can already hear you saying it: "You're going to miss this one day." Of course, when you kids are all grown up, we'll occasionally long for sneakers in three sizes by the door again and the sound of innocent laughter reverberating through the house -- but you know what we won't miss? Sleep deprivation. We won't miss waking up in the morning feeling like we've been working the <i>Dinosaur Train</i> night shift. I, for one, will not miss being a zombie mom.</div><div><br></div><div>We also won't miss stories from friends about how their 16 children all slept through the night by the time they were two weeks old (GOOD FOR YOU), but that's a different story entirely.</div><div><br></div><div>So, children of the world, listen closely. For Mother's Day, drawings are wonderful. Mugs are appreciated. Clay handprints will be treasured forever, we promise. But if you really want to make mommy happy on her special day, please pass the heck out. And stay like that until 10 a.m. Love you and thank you.</div><div><br></div><div><i>Bunmi Laditan's first book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Honest-Toddler-Childs-Guide-Parenting/dp/1476734771/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;sr=&amp;qid=" title=" The Honest Toddler: A Child's Guide to Parenting" target="_blank">The Honest Toddler: A Child's Guide to Parenting</a>, is in stores now.</i></div>
<div>Dear Kids,</div><div><br></div&g t;<div>Mother's Day is upon us again, and television would have you think that we, female parents, are interested in things that most of us would gladly go without.</div><div><br></di v><div><b>1. Jewelry.</b> I don't know about you, but I spend 90 percent of my time in black yoga pants. The other 10 percent is spent naked, looking for a pair clean enough to be worn in public. My only sadness is that they don't make reversible yoga pants so that I can wear them for double the amount of time. Even when I'm working, I look for the softest, most dressed-down clothes that can pass as "professional."</div><div> <br></div><div>I have no need for fancy baubles that my 10-month-old would just try to rip off of my neck or wrists. I change what feels like 100 diapers a day. Perhaps one day I will be dripping in jewels rather than up to my elbows in wipes, but today is not that day.</div><div><br></div> ;<div><b>2. Flowers.</b> While they're beautiful and fragrant, when I see flowers all I think is: Great. Something else I have to feed and keep alive. I will gratefully accept your roses, lilies and tulips, but try not to judge mommy when they're hunched over in a letter "C" three days later because I forgot to empty in the packet or magic crystals and change the water. I have a lot on my mind, sweethearts.</div><div><br>< ;/div><div><b>3. Chocolate. </b>I will graciously accept a box of chocolates, but really... moms can buy those for ourselves. In fact, I have secret chocolate stashed all over the house.</div><div><br></div& gt;<div><b>4. Perfume.</b> Right now I'm wearing Eau de Goldfish. It smells like GMOs and desperation.</div><div><br>< ;/div><div><b>5. Vacuum cleaners, cleaning supplies or pots and pans.</b> Buying one of these items for Mother's Day is an act of war. Be careful. Even if I need or want one of these items, today is not the day to remind me of household obligations.</div><div><br>< ;/div><div>Kids, do you want to make mommy really, truly happy on Mother's Day? If so, there's just one gift that all of us would REALLY love, and I have some good news: it's 100 percent free.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div>We want sleep.</div><div><br></div& gt;<div>We want uninterrupted, deep, snoring, drool-dripping, floating on a comforter, surrounded by pillows, no-kids-in-the-bed, dream-filled sleep. We don't want to be drizzled with magical Sandman dust -- no, we want him to empty the bag out on our heads until it's empty.</div><div><br></div& gt;<div>Even though most of our brains have been programmed to wake up at 6:30 a.m. latest, even if there isn't a young child shaking us from slumber and loudly inquiring about breakfast, we'd still revel in the ability to lie in bed until we come to a complete state of alertness before dealing with bodily fluids or breaking up the first of 10,000 sibling fights.</div><div><br></div ><div>Every mom I know fantasizes about falling into a delicious state of unconsciousness, knowing with full confidence that she won't be jerked awake by the sound of a baby who needs changing, feeding or twilight rocking. Toddlers, we love you dearly. Your inquisitive minds, protruding bellies and signature mispronunciations are all part of your undeniable charm. How about for Mother's Day you stay in your bed and keep your eyes closed until I come get you? Let's put a 24-hour hiatus on the 2 a.m. chitchat and waking up with the sun, shall we?</div><div><br></div> <div>I can already hear you saying it: "You're going to miss this one day." Of course, when you kids are all grown up, we'll occasionally long for sneakers in three sizes by the door again and the sound of innocent laughter reverberating through the house -- but you know what we won't miss? Sleep deprivation. We won't miss waking up in the morning feeling like we've been working the <i>Dinosaur Train</i> night shift. I, for one, will not miss being a zombie mom.</div><div><br></div> ;<div>We also won't miss stories from friends about how their 16 children all slept through the night by the time they were two weeks old (GOOD FOR YOU), but that's a different story entirely.</div><div><br></d iv><div>So, children of the world, listen closely. For Mother's Day, drawings are wonderful. Mugs are appreciated. Clay handprints will be treasured forever, we promise. But if you really want to make mommy happy on her special day, please pass the heck out. And stay like that until 10 a.m. Love you and thank you.</div><div><br></div> ;<div><i>Bunmi Laditan's first book, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Honest-Toddler- Childs-Guide-Parenting/dp/1476734771/ref=tmm_pap _swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;sr=&amp;qid =" title=" The Honest Toddler: A Child's Guide to Parenting" target="_blank">The Honest Toddler: A Child's Guide to Parenting</a>, is in stores now.</i></div>
Bunmi Laditan
Thank You Letter Article 

The Importance Of Mother's Day Every Day

This article details the importance of Mother's Day, and the importance of Moms on a daily basis.
2
<div>Every day should be Mothers Day. Lets make sure we tell our moms and the mothers of our children how special they are to us. If you are a dad, it is our job to lead by example and show them how important Mother's Day is. Start from the very moment she wakes up to the the good night kiss. This year for example, I had my 6 year old help make breakfast and serve my wife in bed. The look on her face was amazing! And I have more surprises to come as the day goes on.</div><div><br></div><div>What I wanted to do today is take a look at Mother's Day. Ask anyone what the most important day of the year is to them and you will get answers ranging from their birthday to Christmas to Election Day. How many will say Mothers Day? Unfortunately, I would guess very few. For some reason Mothers Day gets overlooked or down played a bit. Yes, there are commercials all over reminding you to send flowers or buy mom candy but where is the real sentiment? It is so much more than a gift, or saying Happy Mother's day, it is about truly letting our moms and wives know how much they are appreciated and cared for.</div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps one of the problems is that society has tried to make Mothers Day a tribute to women in general. This is one of our greatest errors. We dont make Fathers Day a tribute to men everywhere, no it is a day for dad. Though I will admit it doesnt get the acknowledgment it should get either. But today is about Mothers Day and our moms not just the mothers that gave birth to us, but the mothers of our children as well. Let's make sure we not only do something special for her but tell her how deeply she is cared for and appreciated this Mother's Day.</div><div><br></div><div>I cannot think of a more thankless job. I hate to even call it a job, but it is work, with long hours, no vacations and no pay. In the end if things dont go the way they are suppose to then it is moms fault. Well mom didnt or Where was your mother when you did this I have said it myself standing in a public place when I see a child act out, the first thought that runs through my mind is Where is that childs mother!?</div><div><br></div><div>With that said, being a mom is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. Ask almost any mother out there and they will tell you that there is not a more rewarding job/role to have then to be a mother. That pride that feeling starts the moment they find out that they are pregnant, it as if life now has a deeper meaning and if you watch, if you pay attention you will see the woman you once knew become one of the most amazing women you will ever meet.</div><div><br></div><div>Without moms where would we be as a society? It is safe to say that our society would be significantly smaller, colder and more ill-mannered. It is our mom that teaches us how to nurture and how to love. It is through her guidance that we as individuals learn how to be empathetic and sympathetic to those around us. How many times have you been in a public place and seen a child get hurt and 3 or 4 moms run to the aid of that child. Obviously they are all not the childs mother, but there is a need there a willingness to make sure those around them are alright.</div><div><br></div><div>I look at the moms that I know, and I think they are all amazing in their own rights. I know that there are many days that if I was in their position I wouldve stayed in bed and covered my head with pillows to block out the existence of all around me but a mom wont do that. Even if a mom is sick she is up taking care of those she loves. Moms are self sacrificing it is in their nature. I dont think it is a trait that females are born with though I think it is a trait that they acquire when they have a baby. Moms will go without just to make sure that their children their husbands their families are taken care of and have everything they need.</div><div><br></div><div>Moms also have the innate ability to make everything alright. You can have the worst day of your life, when you were little youd come home from school sad over a fight that you had with your best friend at school. Mom would listen to you, wipe away your tears and tell you how much she loved you and tell you she knew that tomorrow you and your friend would be okay shed give you a cookie and everything was okay. When you got older all it took was a phone call to mom, she would listen to you and her words would take all of the pain away. Moms never stop they never get a day off they are never really rewarded or credited for all they do.</div><div><br></div><div>This year, on this Mothers Day take the time to thank your mom, and if you are a dad, the mother of our children. Let her know how much she means to you. While in the end moms believe the greatest reward for all they have done is seeing their children turn into happy successful adults they could all use a little acknowledgment a love from us along the way.</div><div><br></div><div>From all of us here at More4kids, we wish you a Happy Mother's Day and thank all moms out there for their love and sacrifice.</div><div><br></div><div><img src="http://www.thankyounotes.org/img/pics/201505_2243_bihfi.jpg" width="333" height="220"></div>
<div>Every day should be Mothers Day. Lets make sure we tell our moms and the mothers of our children how special they are to us. If you are a dad, it is our job to lead by example and show them how important Mother's Day is. Start from the very moment she wakes up to the the good night kiss. This year for example, I had my 6 year old help make breakfast and serve my wife in bed. The look on her face was amazing! And I have more surprises to come as the day goes on.</div><div><br></div> <div>What I wanted to do today is take a look at Mother's Day. Ask anyone what the most important day of the year is to them and you will get answers ranging from their birthday to Christmas to Election Day. How many will say Mothers Day? Unfortunately, I would guess very few. For some reason Mothers Day gets overlooked or down played a bit. Yes, there are commercials all over reminding you to send flowers or buy mom candy but where is the real sentiment? It is so much more than a gift, or saying Happy Mother's day, it is about truly letting our moms and wives know how much they are appreciated and cared for.</div><div><br></div> ;<div>Perhaps one of the problems is that society has tried to make Mothers Day a tribute to women in general. This is one of our greatest errors. We dont make Fathers Day a tribute to men everywhere, no it is a day for dad. Though I will admit it doesnt get the acknowledgment it should get either. But today is about Mothers Day and our moms not just the mothers that gave birth to us, but the mothers of our children as well. Let's make sure we not only do something special for her but tell her how deeply she is cared for and appreciated this Mother's Day.</div><div><br></div> ;<div>I cannot think of a more thankless job. I hate to even call it a job, but it is work, with long hours, no vacations and no pay. In the end if things dont go the way they are suppose to then it is moms fault. Well mom didnt or Where was your mother when you did this I have said it myself standing in a public place when I see a child act out, the first thought that runs through my mind is Where is that childs mother!?</div><div><br></di v><div>With that said, being a mom is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. Ask almost any mother out there and they will tell you that there is not a more rewarding job/role to have then to be a mother. That pride that feeling starts the moment they find out that they are pregnant, it as if life now has a deeper meaning and if you watch, if you pay attention you will see the woman you once knew become one of the most amazing women you will ever meet.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div>Without moms where would we be as a society? It is safe to say that our society would be significantly smaller, colder and more ill-mannered. It is our mom that teaches us how to nurture and how to love. It is through her guidance that we as individuals learn how to be empathetic and sympathetic to those around us. How many times have you been in a public place and seen a child get hurt and 3 or 4 moms run to the aid of that child. Obviously they are all not the childs mother, but there is a need there a willingness to make sure those around them are alright.</div><div><br></di v><div>I look at the moms that I know, and I think they are all amazing in their own rights. I know that there are many days that if I was in their position I wouldve stayed in bed and covered my head with pillows to block out the existence of all around me but a mom wont do that. Even if a mom is sick she is up taking care of those she loves. Moms are self sacrificing it is in their nature. I dont think it is a trait that females are born with though I think it is a trait that they acquire when they have a baby. Moms will go without just to make sure that their children their husbands their families are taken care of and have everything they need.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div>Moms also have the innate ability to make everything alright. You can have the worst day of your life, when you were little youd come home from school sad over a fight that you had with your best friend at school. Mom would listen to you, wipe away your tears and tell you how much she loved you and tell you she knew that tomorrow you and your friend would be okay shed give you a cookie and everything was okay. When you got older all it took was a phone call to mom, she would listen to you and her words would take all of the pain away. Moms never stop they never get a day off they are never really rewarded or credited for all they do.</div><div><br></div> <div>This year, on this Mothers Day take the time to thank your mom, and if you are a dad, the mother of our children. Let her know how much she means to you. While in the end moms believe the greatest reward for all they have done is seeing their children turn into happy successful adults they could all use a little acknowledgment a love from us along the way.</div><div><br></div> ;<div>From all of us here at More4kids, we wish you a Happy Mother's Day and thank all moms out there for their love and sacrifice.</div><div><br></ div><div><img src="http://www.thankyounotes.org/img/pics/ 201505_2243_bihfi.jpg" width="333" height="220"></div>
Happy Mothers Day Uplifting Articles 

7 Wonderful Reasons To Smile And Be Thankful

Seven reasons why we should keep a smile on our faces and be grateful for the lives we have.
3
<div>Looking at my life today, I can think of so many reasons to smile. In fact, if we accentuate the positive, we can all find so many reasons to smile and be thankful. Be thankful for your family, your health, the roof over your head and the lovely parents that you have. Be thankful for having the energy to do as much as you do in one day and being well enough to do this. Be thankful for the gifts you have, whether it is your personality, passion, ambition or all three. There are so many reasons to smile, but let me share with you some more reasons to turn a frown upside down and smile.</div><div><br></div><div><b>1. BE THANKFUL FOR YOUR HEALTH</b></div><div><br></div><div>I just had surgery on my leg last week and let me tell you, I am so thankful to have my mobility. All went well with my&nbsp;surgery&nbsp;but I was so nervous before and after because of how important health is to me. Health is wealth and there is nothing in the #world more important than this. Being healthy tops the reasons to smile!</div><div><br></div><div><div><b>2. BE THANKFUL FOR YOUR PARENTS</b></div><div><br></div><div>Being a mother of three, I finally get all that my parents sacrificed for me because I now live this sacrifice&nbsp;everyday. Parents do all for their children because they want&nbsp;to,&nbsp;and because they have unconditional love. I am thankful for my parents because they taught me so much about life and how to be an excellent mom. So thank your parents and smile!</div></div><div><br></div><div><div><b>3. SMILE FOR THE GIFTS THAT YOU HAVE</b></div><div><br></div><div>Everyone has a special gift that makes them unique. There is no one else in the #world quite like you and that is what makes you so special. You may be ambitious, caring, a great athlete, or just an upbeat person that makes an impact on others' lives. Smile and be thankful for the gifts that you have. You are special!</div></div><div><br></div><div><div><b>4. SMILE FOR THE ROOF OVER YOUR HEAD</b></div><div><br></div><div>Be thankful for the roof over your head. There are&nbsp;<a href="http://api.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&amp;jsonp=&amp;key=&amp;libId=&amp;loc=http%3A%2F%2Finspiration.allwomenstalk.com%2Freasons-to-smile-and-be-thankful%2F4%2F&amp;v=1&amp;out=http%3A%2F%2Fallwomenstalk.com%2Ftag%2Fpeople&amp;title=4.%20Smile%20for%20the%20Roof%20over%20Your%20Head%20-%207%20Wonderful%20Reasons%20to%20Smile%20and%20Be%20Thankful%20...%20%E2%86%92%20Inspiration&amp;txt=%23people" title="#people" target="_blank">#people</a>&nbsp;without homes so let’s be thankful. And if you have the means, help others or volunteer for a great organization like Habitat for Humanity and help build a home to lend a hand!</div></div><div><br></div><div><div><b>5. SMILE FOR YOUR ENERGY</b></div><div><br></div><div>Be thankful that you find the energy to do all that you do in one day. I am sure there are many days you'd much rather&nbsp;relax&nbsp;but you find the energy to work hard. This ability is a great reason to smile. You have to accentuate the positive you have because you are special.</div></div><div><br></div><div><div><b>6. BE THANKFUL FOR YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY</b></div><div><br></div><div>Having a wonderful support network of friends and family is a large reason to smile. Make sure to tell your&nbsp;<a href="http://api.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&amp;jsonp=&amp;key=&amp;libId=&amp;loc=http%3A%2F%2Finspiration.allwomenstalk.com%2Freasons-to-smile-and-be-thankful%2F6%2F&amp;v=1&amp;out=http%3A%2F%2Flifestyle.allwomenstalk.com%2Freasons-to-be-friends-with-your-cousins&amp;title=6.%20Be%20Thankful%20for%20Your%20Friends%20and%20Family%20-%207%20Wonderful%20Reasons%20to%20Smile%20and%20Be%20Thankful%20...%20%E2%86%92%20Inspiration&amp;txt=friends" title="Friends" target="_blank">friends</a>&nbsp;and family you appreciate them and pay it forward by giving them a reason to smile!</div></div><div><br></div><div><div><b>7. SMILE BECAUSE YOU ARE YOU</b></div><div><br></div><div>Be thankful for all that you are and continue to be. Work on bettering yourself each day by helping others and being the best person that you can be. And smile because you are you!</div><div><br></div><div>These are all my reasons to be thankful and smile for each day. Try and&nbsp;<a href="http://api.viglink.com/api/click?format=go&amp;jsonp=&amp;key=&amp;libId=&amp;loc=http%3A%2F%2Finspiration.allwomenstalk.com%2Freasons-to-smile-and-be-thankful%2F7%2F&amp;v=1&amp;out=http%3A%2F%2Fallwomenstalk.com%2Ftag%2Flook&amp;title=7.%20Smile%20Because%20You%20Are%20You%20-%207%20Wonderful%20Reasons%20to%20Smile%20and%20Be%20Thankful%20...%20%E2%86%92%20Inspiration&amp;txt=%23look" title="#look" target="_blank">#look&nbsp;</a>at the glass as half full and be positive because life is what you make of it. Are you grateful for each day? What makes you smile?</div></div>
<div>Looking at my life today, I can think of so many reasons to smile. In fact, if we accentuate the positive, we can all find so many reasons to smile and be thankful. Be thankful for your family, your health, the roof over your head and the lovely parents that you have. Be thankful for having the energy to do as much as you do in one day and being well enough to do this. Be thankful for the gifts you have, whether it is your personality, passion, ambition or all three. There are so many reasons to smile, but let me share with you some more reasons to turn a frown upside down and smile.</div><div><br></div& gt;<div><b>1. BE THANKFUL FOR YOUR HEALTH</b></div><div><br> ;</div><div>I just had surgery on my leg last week and let me tell you, I am so thankful to have my mobility. All went well with my&nbsp;surgery&nbsp;but I was so nervous before and after because of how important health is to me. Health is wealth and there is nothing in the #world more important than this. Being healthy tops the reasons to smile!</div><div><br></div& gt;<div><div><b>2. BE THANKFUL FOR YOUR PARENTS</b></div><div><br&g t;</div><div>Being a mother of three, I finally get all that my parents sacrificed for me because I now live this sacrifice&nbsp;everyday. Parents do all for their children because they want&nbsp;to,&nbsp;and because they have unconditional love. I am thankful for my parents because they taught me so much about life and how to be an excellent mom. So thank your parents and smile!</div></div><div><br& gt;</div><div><div><b>3. SMILE FOR THE GIFTS THAT YOU HAVE</b></div><div><br>& lt;/div><div>Everyone has a special gift that makes them unique. There is no one else in the #world quite like you and that is what makes you so special. You may be ambitious, caring, a great athlete, or just an upbeat person that makes an impact on others' lives. Smile and be thankful for the gifts that you have. You are special!</div></div><div><b r></div><div><div><b> 4. SMILE FOR THE ROOF OVER YOUR HEAD</b></div><div><br>& lt;/div><div>Be thankful for the roof over your head. There are&nbsp;<a href="http://api.viglink.com/api/click?form at=go&amp;jsonp=&amp;key=&amp;libId= &amp;loc=http%3A%2F%2Finspiration.allwomenst alk.com%2Freasons-to-smile-and-be-thankful%2F4%2 F&amp;v=1&amp;out=http%3A%2F%2Fallwomens talk.com%2Ftag%2Fpeople&amp;title=4.%20Smile %20for%20the%20Roof%20over%20Your%20Head%20-%207 %20Wonderful%20Reasons%20to%20Smile%20and%20Be%2 0Thankful%20...%20%E2%86%92%20Inspiration&am p;txt=%23people" title="#people" target="_blank">#people</a>&a mp;nbsp;without homes so let’s be thankful. And if you have the means, help others or volunteer for a great organization like Habitat for Humanity and help build a home to lend a hand!</div></div><div><br&g t;</div><div><div><b>5. SMILE FOR YOUR ENERGY</b></div><div><br> ;</div><div>Be thankful that you find the energy to do all that you do in one day. I am sure there are many days you'd much rather&nbsp;relax&nbsp;but you find the energy to work hard. This ability is a great reason to smile. You have to accentuate the positive you have because you are special.</div></div><div><b r></div><div><div><b> 6. BE THANKFUL FOR YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY</b></div><div><br> ;</div><div>Having a wonderful support network of friends and family is a large reason to smile. Make sure to tell your&nbsp;<a href="http://api.viglink.com/api/click?form at=go&amp;jsonp=&amp;key=&amp;libId= &amp;loc=http%3A%2F%2Finspiration.allwomenst alk.com%2Freasons-to-smile-and-be-thankful%2F6%2 F&amp;v=1&amp;out=http%3A%2F%2Flifestyle .allwomenstalk.com%2Freasons-to-be-friends-with- your-cousins&amp;title=6.%20Be%20Thankful%20 for%20Your%20Friends%20and%20Family%20-%207%20Wo nderful%20Reasons%20to%20Smile%20and%20Be%20Than kful%20...%20%E2%86%92%20Inspiration&amp;txt =friends" title="Friends" target="_blank">friends</a>&a mp;nbsp;and family you appreciate them and pay it forward by giving them a reason to smile!</div></div><div><br& gt;</div><div><div><b>7. SMILE BECAUSE YOU ARE YOU</b></div><div><br>&l t;/div><div>Be thankful for all that you are and continue to be. Work on bettering yourself each day by helping others and being the best person that you can be. And smile because you are you!</div><div><br></div> ;<div>These are all my reasons to be thankful and smile for each day. Try and&nbsp;<a href="http://api.viglink.com/api/click?form at=go&amp;jsonp=&amp;key=&amp;libId= &amp;loc=http%3A%2F%2Finspiration.allwomenst alk.com%2Freasons-to-smile-and-be-thankful%2F7%2 F&amp;v=1&amp;out=http%3A%2F%2Fallwomens talk.com%2Ftag%2Flook&amp;title=7.%20Smile%2 0Because%20You%20Are%20You%20-%207%20Wonderful%2 0Reasons%20to%20Smile%20and%20Be%20Thankful%20.. .%20%E2%86%92%20Inspiration&amp;txt=%23look& quot; title="#look" target="_blank">#look&nbsp;< /a>at the glass as half full and be positive because life is what you make of it. Are you grateful for each day? What makes you smile?</div></div>
Tara Zimliki
Inspirational Woman Inspiration 

More Than Words: Saying Thank You Does Make A Difference

A research article explains why saying 'thank you' is more important than we may have previously believed.
4
<div>Two little words can say so much.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ilyaericlee/58742420" title="Flickr" target="_blank">Flickr/Ilya Lee</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/" title="CC BY-ND" target="_blank">CC BY-ND</a></div><div><br></div><div>Most of us were taught that saying “thank you” is simply the polite thing to do. But recent research in social psychology suggests that saying “thank you” goes beyond good manners – it also serves to build and maintain social relationships.</div><div><br></div><div>This premise has its base in the find-remind-and-bind theory of gratitude, proposed by US psychologist&nbsp;<a href="http://www.saraalgoe.com/" title="Sara Algoe" target="_blank">Sara Algoe</a>, from the University of North Carolina. According to this theory, gratitude prompts:</div><div><br></div><div><ul><li>the initiation of new social relationships (a find function)</li><li>orients people to existing social relationships (a remind function)</li><li>promotes maintenance of and investment in these relationships (a bind function)</li></ul></div><div><br></div><div>As with all emotions, gratitude can be both felt and expressed. The evidence on how feeling gratitude functions to find, remind, and bind in social relationships is robust. From promoting helping and trust to lowering aggression, feeling grateful gives rise to&nbsp;<a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/gratitude/definition#what_is" title="A wide range of outcomes" target="_blank">a wide range of outcomes</a>&nbsp;that benefit both parties in a social relationship.</div><div><br></div><div>Turning to expressing gratitude, the existing work is relatively sparse. The evidence that does exist largely focuses on ongoing social relationships, such as those between romantic partners.</div><div><br></div><div><b>When we say ‘thank you’</b></div><div><br></div><div>It only takes a moment of reflection to realise that expressions of gratitude are not solely relegated to such ongoing social relationships.</div><div><br></div><div><img src="http://www.thankyounotes.org/img/pics/201504_1620_cddeb.jpg" width="640" height="945"></div><div><i>Saying “thank you” to strangers.&nbsp;</i><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/worldoflard/6808551725" title="Flickr" target="_blank">Flickr/worldoflard</a>&nbsp;,&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/" title="CC BY-NC" target="_blank">CC BY-NC</a></div><div><br></div><div>When a stranger holds a door, when a barista hands over the morning espresso or when we step off the bus, we typically (or should!) say “thank you”.</div><div><br></div><div>The question becomes: how do these expressions of gratitude among strangers shape social relations? Might hearing “thank you” help us “find” new social relationships?</div><div><br></div><div>So my colleague Monica Y Bartlett, from Gonzaga University in Washington, US, and I carried out the first empirical test of the “find” function of expressing gratitude among strangers, with the results&nbsp;<a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/" title="Published" target="_blank">published&nbsp;</a>this month in the journal&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25111881" title="Emotion" target="_blank">Emotion</a>.</div><div><br></div><div>In the study, we sought to create a situation in the lab where we could manipulate the expression of gratitude in a realistic way. So we asked our 70 undergraduate participants to help pilot a new mentoring program supposedly run by the university.</div><div><br></div><div>As part of the pilot, all of our participants were to act as mentors by giving advice on a writing sample from a high-school student mentee. The writing sample was one that the mentee planned to use in their university admissions package.</div><div><br></div><div>This setup ensured that we satisfied one of the core starting points of gratitude – the granting of help, resources or a favour.</div><div><br></div><div>A week later, we brought the participants back to the lab. All participants received a note purportedly written by the high school mentee. For half of the participants – those in the control condition - this note simply acknowledged the advice.</div><div><br></div><blockquote style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;"><i>I received your feedback through the editing program. I hope to use the paper for my college applications.</i></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Here comes the manipulation of gratitude expression. Critically, for the other half of the participants, the note also included an expression of gratitude.</div><div><br></div><blockquote style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;"><i>Thank you SO much for all the time and effort you put into doing that for me!</i></blockquote><div><br></div><div>This design meant that all participants received a note – just the content of the note differed across conditions.</div><div><br></div><div>Participants next completed a series of questionnaires assessing their impressions of the mentee, and then were informed that the study was complete.</div><div><br></div><div>Except, that wasn’t quite true. The researcher casually mentioned that the pilot program organisers had left a set of notecards for mentors to complete if they chose to. The program organisers would ensure that the mentee received the note if the mentee were accepted to the university.</div><div><br></div><div>The researcher made it clear that leaving a note was completely optional and then left the room. Participants were thus left alone to decide whether to write a note, and, if so, what to say.</div><div><br></div><div>This note-writing opportunity served as our dependent measure of actual social affiliation. Would participants take the opportunity to establish a social relationship with their mentee? Would this depend on whether the mentee had expressed gratitude?</div><div><br></div><div><b>How far does gratitude go?</b></div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps not surprisingly, all but three participants wrote a welcome note (university students are, after all, a pretty kind bunch). Promisingly for the “find” hypothesis, all three participants who didn’t leave a note were in the control condition.</div><div><br></div><div><img src="http://www.thankyounotes.org/img/pics/201504_1614_ecchi.jpg" width="640" height="959"></div><div><i>More than just a note - saying “thank you” makes a difference.</i>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/meddygarnet/4273172566" title="Flickr/Morgan" target="_blank">Flickr/Morgan</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/" title="CC BY" target="_blank">CC BY</a></div><div><br></div><div>To test the “find” hypothesis more directly, we coded what participants wrote in those notes and a pattern quickly became clear.</div><div><br></div><div>Of the participants who had received a note expressing gratitude from their mentee, 68% left their contact details in their note. Only 42% of those who had received the control note left any contact details. The difference was statistically significant.</div><div><br></div><div>Next we tested what might explain this difference. For this, we looked to how participants rated their mentees. Specifically, we considered two dimensions – interpersonal warmth (kindness and friendliness) and competence (skill and intelligence).</div><div><br></div><div>We reasoned that if gratitude expressions function to service social relationships, the effect should be better explained by warmth than by competence.</div><div><br></div><div>Sure enough, mentees were perceived as more interpersonally warm when they had expressed gratitude. Further, this increase in perceived interpersonal warmth explained the increase in&nbsp;likelihood&nbsp;of leaving contact information for the gratitude-expressing mentees. This wasn’t the case for competence.</div><div><br></div><div><b>The takeaway message</b></div><div><br></div><div>Saying “thank you” goes beyond good manners. At the end of the day, initiating a social bond can be risky. We need to be selective and choose to invest in those bonds with the highest likelihood of being a good investment. In this context, an expression of gratitude serves as a signal that the&nbsp;expresser&nbsp;is a good candidate for a future social relationship.</div><div><br></div><div>Expanding the premise a bit further, perhaps the gratitude challenges that have swept social media (in their&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/" title="7" target="_blank">7</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lindsay-holmes/the-gratitude-challenge-d_b_5697872.html" title="10" target="_blank">10</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://gratitudechallenge.com/" title="21" target="_blank">21</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://grandeurvision.wordpress.com/100-day-gratitude-challenge/" title="100" target="_blank">100</a>, or&nbsp;<a href="http://365grateful.com/original-365-project" title="365" target="_blank">365</a>&nbsp;day&nbsp;forms) might have downstream benefit.</div><div><br></div><div><iframe width="640" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OHxlXLDMG0Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div><div><br></div><div>In these challenges, a person posts verbal statements or photographs of things for which they are grateful on a daily basis via Facebook, Instagram, Blog, or Twitter – in essence, a very public and ongoing&nbsp;<a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/" title="Gratitude Journal" target="_blank">gratitude&nbsp;</a>journal.</div><div><br></div><div>There’s little doubt this has a positive effect on the social relationships directly implicated in these expressions (between romantic partners, family members, and friends), though some find it annoying and question whether it’s sustainable. Our findings suggest that undertaking such gratitude challenges might have an effect on how even strangers come to see us.</div><div><br></div><div>While many questions remain for future research, our research provides initial evidence for the power of saying “thank you” to strangers. Something to keep in mind the next time you pick up your dry cleaning or are given a seat on the train.</div>
<div>Two little words can say so much.&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/ilyaeri clee/58742420" title="Flickr" target="_blank">Flickr/Ilya Lee</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b y-nd/4.0/" title="CC BY-ND" target="_blank">CC BY-ND</a></div><div><br> </div><div>Most of us were taught that saying “thank you” is simply the polite thing to do. But recent research in social psychology suggests that saying “thank you” goes beyond good manners – it also serves to build and maintain social relationships.</div><div><br>& lt;/div><div>This premise has its base in the find-remind-and-bind theory of gratitude, proposed by US psychologist&nbsp;<a href="http://www.saraalgoe.com/" title="Sara Algoe" target="_blank">Sara Algoe</a>, from the University of North Carolina. According to this theory, gratitude prompts:</div><div><br></di v><div><ul><li>the initiation of new social relationships (a find function)</li><li>orients people to existing social relationships (a remind function)</li><li>promotes maintenance of and investment in these relationships (a bind function)</li></ul></div><d iv><br></div><div>As with all emotions, gratitude can be both felt and expressed. The evidence on how feeling gratitude functions to find, remind, and bind in social relationships is robust. From promoting helping and trust to lowering aggression, feeling grateful gives rise to&nbsp;<a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic /gratitude/definition#what_is" title="A wide range of outcomes" target="_blank">a wide range of outcomes</a>&nbsp;that benefit both parties in a social relationship.</div><div><br>&l t;/div><div>Turning to expressing gratitude, the existing work is relatively sparse. The evidence that does exist largely focuses on ongoing social relationships, such as those between romantic partners.</div><div><br></d iv><div><b>When we say ‘thank you’</b></div><div>< ;br></div><div>It only takes a moment of reflection to realise that expressions of gratitude are not solely relegated to such ongoing social relationships.</div><div><br>& lt;/div><div><img src="http://www.thankyounotes.org/img/pics/ 201504_1620_cddeb.jpg" width="640" height="945"></div><div> ;<i>Saying “thank you” to strangers.&nbsp;</i><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/worldof lard/6808551725" title="Flickr" target="_blank">Flickr/worldoflard& lt;/a>&nbsp;,&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b y-nc/4.0/" title="CC BY-NC" target="_blank">CC BY-NC</a></div><div><br> </div><div>When a stranger holds a door, when a barista hands over the morning espresso or when we step off the bus, we typically (or should!) say “thank you”.</div><div><br>&l t;/div><div>The question becomes: how do these expressions of gratitude among strangers shape social relations? Might hearing “thank you” help us “find” new social relationships?</div><div><br>& lt;/div><div>So my colleague Monica Y Bartlett, from Gonzaga University in Washington, US, and I carried out the first empirical test of the “find” function of expressing gratitude among strangers, with the results&nbsp;<a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publicat ion/" title="Published" target="_blank">published&nbsp; </a>this month in the journal&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25 111881" title="Emotion" target="_blank">Emotion</a>.& lt;/div><div><br></div>< div>In the study, we sought to create a situation in the lab where we could manipulate the expression of gratitude in a realistic way. So we asked our 70 undergraduate participants to help pilot a new mentoring program supposedly run by the university.</div><div><br>< /div><div>As part of the pilot, all of our participants were to act as mentors by giving advice on a writing sample from a high-school student mentee. The writing sample was one that the mentee planned to use in their university admissions package.</div><div><br></di v><div>This setup ensured that we satisfied one of the core starting points of gratitude – the granting of help, resources or a favour.</div><div><br></div ><div>A week later, we brought the participants back to the lab. All participants received a note purportedly written by the high school mentee. For half of the participants – those in the control condition - this note simply acknowledged the advice.</div><div><br></div ><blockquote style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;"><i>I received your feedback through the editing program. I hope to use the paper for my college applications.</i></blockquote><di v><br></div><div>Here comes the manipulation of gratitude expression. Critically, for the other half of the participants, the note also included an expression of gratitude.</div><div><br></ div><blockquote style="margin: 0px 0px 0px 40px; border: none; padding: 0px;"><i>Thank you SO much for all the time and effort you put into doing that for me!</i></blockquote><div><b r></div><div>This design meant that all participants received a note – just the content of the note differed across conditions.</div><div><br>< /div><div>Participants next completed a series of questionnaires assessing their impressions of the mentee, and then were informed that the study was complete.</div><div><br></d iv><div>Except, that wasn’t quite true. The researcher casually mentioned that the pilot program organisers had left a set of notecards for mentors to complete if they chose to. The program organisers would ensure that the mentee received the note if the mentee were accepted to the university.</div><div><br>< /div><div>The researcher made it clear that leaving a note was completely optional and then left the room. Participants were thus left alone to decide whether to write a note, and, if so, what to say.</div><div><br></div> ;<div>This note-writing opportunity served as our dependent measure of actual social affiliation. Would participants take the opportunity to establish a social relationship with their mentee? Would this depend on whether the mentee had expressed gratitude?</div><div><br></ div><div><b>How far does gratitude go?</b></div><div><br>&l t;/div><div>Perhaps not surprisingly, all but three participants wrote a welcome note (university students are, after all, a pretty kind bunch). Promisingly for the “find” hypothesis, all three participants who didn’t leave a note were in the control condition.</div><div><br></ div><div><img src="http://www.thankyounotes.org/img/pics/ 201504_1614_ecchi.jpg" width="640" height="959"></div><div> ;<i>More than just a note - saying “thank you” makes a difference.</i>&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/meddyga rnet/4273172566" title="Flickr/Morgan" target="_blank">Flickr/Morgan</a >,&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b y/4.0/" title="CC BY" target="_blank">CC BY</a></div><div><br>< ;/div><div>To test the “find” hypothesis more directly, we coded what participants wrote in those notes and a pattern quickly became clear.</div><div><br></div& gt;<div>Of the participants who had received a note expressing gratitude from their mentee, 68% left their contact details in their note. Only 42% of those who had received the control note left any contact details. The difference was statistically significant.</div><div><br>< ;/div><div>Next we tested what might explain this difference. For this, we looked to how participants rated their mentees. Specifically, we considered two dimensions – interpersonal warmth (kindness and friendliness) and competence (skill and intelligence).</div><div><br>& lt;/div><div>We reasoned that if gratitude expressions function to service social relationships, the effect should be better explained by warmth than by competence.</div><div><br>< /div><div>Sure enough, mentees were perceived as more interpersonally warm when they had expressed gratitude. Further, this increase in perceived interpersonal warmth explained the increase in&nbsp;likelihood&nbsp;of leaving contact information for the gratitude-expressing mentees. This wasn’t the case for competence.</div><div><br>< /div><div><b>The takeaway message</b></div><div><br&g t;</div><div>Saying “thank you” goes beyond good manners. At the end of the day, initiating a social bond can be risky. We need to be selective and choose to invest in those bonds with the highest likelihood of being a good investment. In this context, an expression of gratitude serves as a signal that the&nbsp;expresser&nbsp;is a good candidate for a future social relationship.</div><div><br>&l t;/div><div>Expanding the premise a bit further, perhaps the gratitude challenges that have swept social media (in their&nbsp;<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/" title="7" target="_blank">7</a>,&nb sp;<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lindsay -holmes/the-gratitude-challenge-d_b_5697872.html " title="10" target="_blank">10</a>,&n bsp;<a href="http://gratitudechallenge.com/" title="21" target="_blank">21</a>,&n bsp;<a href="http://grandeurvision.wordpress.com/1 00-day-gratitude-challenge/" title="100" target="_blank">100</a>, or&nbsp;<a href="http://365grateful.com/original-365-p roject" title="365" target="_blank">365</a>&n bsp;day&nbsp;forms) might have downstream benefit.</div><div><br></di v><div><iframe width="640" height="480" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OHxlXLDM G0Q" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>& lt;/div><div><br></div>< div>In these challenges, a person posts verbal statements or photographs of things for which they are grateful on a daily basis via Facebook, Instagram, Blog, or Twitter – in essence, a very public and ongoing&nbsp;<a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/artic le/item/" title="Gratitude Journal" target="_blank">gratitude&nbsp; </a>journal.</div><div><br& gt;</div><div>There’s little doubt this has a positive effect on the social relationships directly implicated in these expressions (between romantic partners, family members, and friends), though some find it annoying and question whether it’s sustainable. Our findings suggest that undertaking such gratitude challenges might have an effect on how even strangers come to see us.</div><div><br></div> <div>While many questions remain for future research, our research provides initial evidence for the power of saying “thank you” to strangers. Something to keep in mind the next time you pick up your dry cleaning or are given a seat on the train.</div>
Lisa A. Williams
Inspirational Positivity 

7 Scientifically Proven Benefits Of Gratitude That Will Motivate You To Give Thanks Year-Round

A short piece points out 7 things that we may be able to do to help us stay with an attitude of gratitude all year round.
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<div><div><i>Fotolia</i></div><div><br></div><div>It’s that time of year where many people begin thinking about everything they have to be thankful for. Although it’s nice to count your blessings on Thanksgiving, being thankful throughout the year could have tremendous benefits&nbsp;on&nbsp;your quality of life.</div><div><br></div><div>In fact, gratitude may be one of the most overlooked tools that we all have access to every day. Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and it certainly doesn’t take much time, but the benefits are enormous. Research reveals gratitude can have these seven benefits:</div><div><br></div><div><b>1. Gratitude opens the door to more relationships.</b>&nbsp;Not only does saying “thank you” constitute good manners, but showing appreciation can help you win new friends, according to a 2104 study published in Emotion. The study found that thanking a new acquaintance makes them more likely to seek an ongoing relationship. So whether you thank a stranger for holding the door or you send a quick thank-you note to that co-worker who helped you with a project, acknowledging other people’s contributions can lead to new opportunities.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><b>2. Gratitude improves physical&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/health/" title="Health" target="_blank">health</a></b>. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and they report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Not surprisingly, grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health. &nbsp;They exercise more often and are more likely to attend regular check-ups with their doctors, which is likely to contribute to further longevity.</div><div><br></div><div><b>3. Gratitude improves psychological health.</b>&nbsp;Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., a leading gratitude researcher, has conducted multiple studies on the link between gratitude and well-being. His research confirms that gratitude effectively increases happiness and reduces depression.</div><div><br></div><div><b>4. Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression.&nbsp;</b>Grateful people are more likely to behave in a prosocial manner, even when others behave less kind, according to a 2012 study by the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/colleges/university-of-kentucky/" title="University of Kentucky" target="_blank">University of Kentucky.&nbsp;</a>Study participants who ranked higher on gratitude scales were less likely to retaliate against others, even when given negative feedback. They experienced more sensitivity and empathy toward other people and a decreased desire to seek revenge.</div><div><br></div><div><b>5. Grateful people sleep better.&nbsp;</b>Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer.</div><div><br></div><div><b>6. Gratitude improves self-esteem.</b>&nbsp;A 2014 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Applied&nbsp;Sport&nbsp;Psychology&nbsp;</i>found that gratitude increased athlete’s self-esteem, which is an essential component&nbsp;to&nbsp;optimal performance. Other studies have shown that gratitude reduces social comparisons. Rather than becoming resentful toward people who have more money or better jobs – which is a major factor in reduced self-esteem- grateful people are able to appreciate other people’s accomplishments.</div><div><br></div><div><b>7. Gratitude increases mental strength.&nbsp;</b>For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma. &nbsp;A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War Veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. &nbsp;A 2003 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Personality and Social Psychology</i>&nbsp;found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the terrorist attacks on September 11. &nbsp;Recognizing all you have to be thankful for – even during the worst times of your life – fosters resilience.</div><div><br></div><div>We all have the ability and opportunity to cultivate gratitude. Simply take a few moments to focus on all that you have – rather than complain about all the things you think you deserve. &nbsp;Developing an “attitude of gratitude” is one of the simplest ways to improve your satisfaction with life.</div><div><br></div><div><i>Amy Morin is a psychotherapist and the author of</i>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amymorinlcsw.com/book/" title="13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do" target="_blank">13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do</a>.</div></div>
<div><div><i>Fotolia</i> </div><div><br></div>< ;div>It’s that time of year where many people begin thinking about everything they have to be thankful for. Although it’s nice to count your blessings on Thanksgiving, being thankful throughout the year could have tremendous benefits&nbsp;on&nbsp;your quality of life.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div>In fact, gratitude may be one of the most overlooked tools that we all have access to every day. Cultivating gratitude doesn’t cost any money and it certainly doesn’t take much time, but the benefits are enormous. Research reveals gratitude can have these seven benefits:</div><div><br></d iv><div><b>1. Gratitude opens the door to more relationships.</b>&nbsp;Not only does saying “thank you” constitute good manners, but showing appreciation can help you win new friends, according to a 2104 study published in Emotion. The study found that thanking a new acquaintance makes them more likely to seek an ongoing relationship. So whether you thank a stranger for holding the door or you send a quick thank-you note to that co-worker who helped you with a project, acknowledging other people’s contributions can lead to new opportunities.</div><div><br>& lt;/div><div><br></div>< div><b>2. Gratitude improves physical&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/health/" title="Health" target="_blank">health</a>< ;/b>. Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and they report feeling healthier than other people, according to a 2012 study published in Personality and Individual Differences. Not surprisingly, grateful people are also more likely to take care of their health. &nbsp;They exercise more often and are more likely to attend regular check-ups with their doctors, which is likely to contribute to further longevity.</div><div><br></ div><div><b>3. Gratitude improves psychological health.</b>&nbsp;Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, ranging from envy and resentment to frustration and regret. Robert A. Emmons, Ph.D., a leading gratitude researcher, has conducted multiple studies on the link between gratitude and well-being. His research confirms that gratitude effectively increases happiness and reduces depression.</div><div><br>< /div><div><b>4. Gratitude enhances empathy and reduces aggression.&nbsp;</b>Grateful people are more likely to behave in a prosocial manner, even when others behave less kind, according to a 2012 study by the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/colleges/univer sity-of-kentucky/" title="University of Kentucky" target="_blank">University of Kentucky.&nbsp;</a>Study participants who ranked higher on gratitude scales were less likely to retaliate against others, even when given negative feedback. They experienced more sensitivity and empathy toward other people and a decreased desire to seek revenge.</div><div><br></di v><div><b>5. Grateful people sleep better.&nbsp;</b>Writing in a gratitude journal improves sleep, according to a 2011 study published in Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Spend just 15 minutes jotting down a few grateful sentiments before bed, and you may sleep better and longer.</div><div><br></div ><div><b>6. Gratitude improves self-esteem.</b>&nbsp;A 2014 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Applied&nbsp;Sport&nbsp;Psychology&n bsp;</i>found that gratitude increased athlete’s self-esteem, which is an essential component&nbsp;to&nbsp;optimal performance. Other studies have shown that gratitude reduces social comparisons. Rather than becoming resentful toward people who have more money or better jobs – which is a major factor in reduced self-esteem- grateful people are able to appreciate other people’s accomplishments.</div><div><br> ;</div><div><b>7. Gratitude increases mental strength.&nbsp;</b>For years, research has shown gratitude not only reduces stress, but it may also play a major role in overcoming trauma. &nbsp;A 2006 study published in Behavior Research and Therapy found that Vietnam War Veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. &nbsp;A 2003 study published in the&nbsp;<i>Journal of Personality and Social Psychology</i>&nbsp;found that gratitude was a major contributor to resilience following the terrorist attacks on September 11. &nbsp;Recognizing all you have to be thankful for – even during the worst times of your life – fosters resilience.</div><div><br>< /div><div>We all have the ability and opportunity to cultivate gratitude. Simply take a few moments to focus on all that you have – rather than complain about all the things you think you deserve. &nbsp;Developing an “attitude of gratitude” is one of the simplest ways to improve your satisfaction with life.</div><div><br></div&g t;<div><i>Amy Morin is a psychotherapist and the author of</i>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amymorinlcsw.com/book/&quo t; title="13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do" target="_blank">13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do</a>.</div></div>
Amy Morin
Inspirational 
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